geniuscat:

She’s like a black sausage with arms.

geniuscat:

She’s like a black sausage with arms.

gracefully-found:

I need you in my life.

gracefully-found:

I need you in my life.

(Source: punkassliam)

demons-detectives-and-the-doctor:

onlylolgifs:

cat stuck in a bathtub

Look at how done he is in the last gif

fuckyeah-bloggers:

lovely pepa

fuckyeah-bloggers:

lovely pepa

topshop:

Festival grunge meets city glam – what a mix!

topshop:

Festival grunge meets city glam – what a mix!

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Je Rêve de Paris: I Dream of Paris
In a suburb outside the Philippine capital of Metro Manila, is a street lined with large modern two-story homes called, “The Parisian Village.” It’s a neighborhood built ground up on euros funneled home by domestic workers living overseas in Paris, hence the name. 
Through a highly connected network, odd jobs like ironing, babysitting, drying clothes are passed around, with sums that can average 1,000 euros—more if they can take on extra jobs here and there.
It is a lot more than the monthly P10,000 ($227 | €161) Rhoda and her husband, Ricky could make on their combined income as a public school teacher and jeepney driver, a common form of public transportation in the Philippines.
The couple borrowed a total of PhP 700,000 [equivalent to roughly $15,000 | €11,290] as a “placement fee” for Rhoda to get to Paris on a tourist visa. The placement fee is a package that comes with a suitcase, cold climate clothes and a briefing on how to credibly look and act like a tourist at the airport.
Rhoda now works as a nanny for a young child. In addition, she washes or irons clothes for others families who need looking for domestic services. Since labor in France is paid for by the hour, every hour, every euro counts and brings her closer to paying off the debt incurred [for] the placement fee.
It brings her no closer to returning to the Philippines, however.
In Paris as an undocumented migrant worker, Rhoda can neither travel home to visit her Ricky nor their 8-year old son. It has been three years now since she last saw them, but if she leaves France, she knows it will be the end of her family’s Parisian dream.

*Names have been changed.


Image and text by Ana P. Santos. Philippines, 2014.
For her upcoming project reporting on Filipino women working as nannies in Dubai, United Arab Emirates and in Paris, France entitled, “Who Takes Care of Nanny’s Children?”

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Je Rêve de Paris: I Dream of Paris

In a suburb outside the Philippine capital of Metro Manila, is a street lined with large modern two-story homes called, “The Parisian Village.” It’s a neighborhood built ground up on euros funneled home by domestic workers living overseas in Paris, hence the name. 

Through a highly connected network, odd jobs like ironing, babysitting, drying clothes are passed around, with sums that can average 1,000 euros—more if they can take on extra jobs here and there.

It is a lot more than the monthly P10,000 ($227 | 161) Rhoda and her husband, Ricky could make on their combined income as a public school teacher and jeepney driver, a common form of public transportation in the Philippines.

The couple borrowed a total of PhP 700,000 [equivalent to roughly $15,000 | 11,290] as a “placement fee” for Rhoda to get to Paris on a tourist visa. The placement fee is a package that comes with a suitcase, cold climate clothes and a briefing on how to credibly look and act like a tourist at the airport.

Rhoda now works as a nanny for a young child. In addition, she washes or irons clothes for others families who need looking for domestic services. Since labor in France is paid for by the hour, every hour, every euro counts and brings her closer to paying off the debt incurred [for] the placement fee.

It brings her no closer to returning to the Philippines, however.

In Paris as an undocumented migrant worker, Rhoda can neither travel home to visit her Ricky nor their 8-year old son. It has been three years now since she last saw them, but if she leaves France, she knows it will be the end of her family’s Parisian dream.

*Names have been changed.

Image and text by Ana P. Santos. Philippines, 2014.

For her upcoming project reporting on Filipino women working as nannies in Dubai, United Arab Emirates and in Paris, France entitled, “Who Takes Care of Nanny’s Children?”

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Je Rêve de Paris: I Dream of Paris
In a suburb outside the Philippine capital of Metro Manila, is a street lined with large modern two-story homes called, “The Parisian Village.” It’s a neighborhood built ground up on euros funneled home by domestic workers living overseas in Paris, hence the name. 
Through a highly connected network, odd jobs like ironing, babysitting, drying clothes are passed around, with sums that can average 1,000 euros—more if they can take on extra jobs here and there.
It is a lot more than the monthly P10,000 ($227 | €161) Rhoda and her husband, Ricky could make on their combined income as a public school teacher and jeepney driver, a common form of public transportation in the Philippines.
The couple borrowed a total of PhP 700,000 [equivalent to roughly $15,000 | €11,290] as a “placement fee” for Rhoda to get to Paris on a tourist visa. The placement fee is a package that comes with a suitcase, cold climate clothes and a briefing on how to credibly look and act like a tourist at the airport.
Rhoda now works as a nanny for a young child. In addition, she washes or irons clothes for others families who need looking for domestic services. Since labor in France is paid for by the hour, every hour, every euro counts and brings her closer to paying off the debt incurred [for] the placement fee.
It brings her no closer to returning to the Philippines, however.
In Paris as an undocumented migrant worker, Rhoda can neither travel home to visit her Ricky nor their 8-year old son. It has been three years now since she last saw them, but if she leaves France, she knows it will be the end of her family’s Parisian dream.

*Names have been changed.


Image and text by Ana P. Santos. Philippines, 2014.
For her upcoming project reporting on Filipino women working as nannies in Dubai, United Arab Emirates and in Paris, France entitled, “Who Takes Care of Nanny’s Children?”

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Je Rêve de Paris: I Dream of Paris

In a suburb outside the Philippine capital of Metro Manila, is a street lined with large modern two-story homes called, “The Parisian Village.” It’s a neighborhood built ground up on euros funneled home by domestic workers living overseas in Paris, hence the name. 

Through a highly connected network, odd jobs like ironing, babysitting, drying clothes are passed around, with sums that can average 1,000 euros—more if they can take on extra jobs here and there.

It is a lot more than the monthly P10,000 ($227 | 161) Rhoda and her husband, Ricky could make on their combined income as a public school teacher and jeepney driver, a common form of public transportation in the Philippines.

The couple borrowed a total of PhP 700,000 [equivalent to roughly $15,000 | 11,290] as a “placement fee” for Rhoda to get to Paris on a tourist visa. The placement fee is a package that comes with a suitcase, cold climate clothes and a briefing on how to credibly look and act like a tourist at the airport.

Rhoda now works as a nanny for a young child. In addition, she washes or irons clothes for others families who need looking for domestic services. Since labor in France is paid for by the hour, every hour, every euro counts and brings her closer to paying off the debt incurred [for] the placement fee.

It brings her no closer to returning to the Philippines, however.

In Paris as an undocumented migrant worker, Rhoda can neither travel home to visit her Ricky nor their 8-year old son. It has been three years now since she last saw them, but if she leaves France, she knows it will be the end of her family’s Parisian dream.

*Names have been changed.

Image and text by Ana P. Santos. Philippines, 2014.

For her upcoming project reporting on Filipino women working as nannies in Dubai, United Arab Emirates and in Paris, France entitled, “Who Takes Care of Nanny’s Children?”